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Machine Readable Labels In The Blood Transfusion Service

RRP $271.99

Dr W J Jenkins In 1977 when the Sheffield Transfusion Centre took delivery of the first GROUPAMATIC blood grouping machine in the UK it was equipped with a sample identification system involving complicated and expensive disposable punched cards. In fact, the cards were so expensive that Dr Wagstaff was unable to find the revenue to support the system. A year later, when Brentwood took delivery of a GROUPAMATIC, we were faced with the same problem, but by chance we heard that KONTRON was developing a laser scanning system for bar code labels and we were able to have our machine modified. Subsequently the Sheffield machine was altered to take the bar code scanner. At about the same time the Bristol Centre was helping TECHNICON with the development of the AUTO GROUPER C-16, and fortunately they decided on a laser reader of the same type for bar code identification. Thus there were three centres with the capability for reading bar codes on blood grouping machines and it became necessary to find someone to produce the bar code labels. There was only on~ printer in the UK who could produce labels to the required specification. To cut the costs of printing, and in the hope of avoiding a wide variation in codes, I invited representatives of centres interested in the problem to a meeting, where we set up what we called the Group of Six. This later became an official Working Party of the Regional Transfusion Directors.


Micromachined Mirrors

RRP $35.00

Micromachined scanning mirrors are interesting for a wide variety of applications because of their potential low cost, high speed, low power consumption, and reliability. These mirrors can offer significant advantages over macro-scale mirrors, but the fundamental limitations of scanning mirrors have not been widely discussed.
Miniaturization in electronic systems has led to radical improvements in computers and communications, and micromachining technologies promise to generate such improvements in miniaturized mechanical and optical systems, including specifically higher-speed, smaller, lower-cost scanning mirrors. Micromachined Mirrors provides an overview of the performance enhancements that will be realized by miniaturizing scanning mirrors like those used for laser printers and barcode scanners, and the newly enabled applications, including raster-scanning projection video displays and compact, high-speed fiber-optic components.
There are a wide variety of methods used to fabricate micromachined mirrors - each with its advantages and disadvantages. There are, however, performance criteria common to mirrors made from any of these fabrication processes. For example, optical resolution is related to the mirror aperture, the mirror flatness, and the scan angle. Micromachined Mirrors provides a framework for the design of micromirrors, and derives equations showing the fundamental limits for micromirror performance. These limits provide the micromirror designer tools with which to determine the acceptable mirror geometries, and to quickly and easily determine the range of possible mirror optical resolution and scan speed.
Micromachined Mirrors presents descriptions of mirrors made from two fabrication processes - the surface-micromachining process and the staggered torsional electrostatic combdrive (STEC) high-aspect ratio micromachining process. The mirrors made using these two processes are evaluated for scan speed, optical resolution, ease of manufacture, and reliability.
Micromachined Mirrors also presents an example application of surface-micromachined mirrors: a raster-scanning projection video display. This demonstration shows the advantages of micromachined mirrors (small high-speed scanners) with special attention paid to the major drawback of surface-micromachined mirrors (lower resolution due to dynamic deformation). The successful demonstration of this simple prototype video display helps clarify the importance of the critical performance characteristics to consider when designing micromachined mirrors.


Micromachined Mirrors

RRP $574.99

Micromachined Mirrors provides an overview of the performance enhancements that will be realized by miniaturizing scanning mirrors like those used for laser printers and barcode scanners, and the newly enabled applications, including raster-scanning projection video displays and compact, high-speed fiber-optic components.
There are a wide variety of methods used to fabricate micromachined mirrors - each with its advantages and disadvantages. There are, however, performance criteria common to mirrors made from any of these fabrication processes. For example, optical resolution is related to the mirror aperture, the mirror flatness, and the scan angle. Micromachined Mirrors provides a framework for the design of micromirrors, and derives equations showing the fundamental limits for micromirror performance. These limits provide the micromirror designer tools with which to determine the acceptable mirror geometries, and to quickly and easily determine the range of possible mirror optical resolution and scan speed.


Ultrashort Laser Pulse Phenomena

RRP $50.99

Ultrashort Laser Pulse Phenomena serves as an introduction to the phenomena of ultrashort laser pulses and describes how this technology can be applied in areas such as spectroscopy, medical imaging, electromagnetism, optics, and quantum physics. Combining the principles with experimental techniques, the book serves as a guide to designing and constructing femtosecond systems.
The second edition has updated and expanded its content, and includes more examples of ultrashort sources and a more comprehensive fundamentals chapter. Diagnostic techniques and applications involving sensors, mode-locked lasers, and imaging have been fully revised to include current technologies.
Written in a tutorial style, this book is suitable for senior undergraduate and graduate students as well as engineers and scientists working in the areas of optics, spectroscopy, optical imaging, photochemistry, and ultrafast science and engineering.
*Provides an easy to follow guide through "faster than electronics" probing and detection methods
*THE manual on designing and constructing femtosecond systems and experiments
*Discusses essential technology for applications in micro-machining, femtochemistry, and medical imaging


A Brief Illustrated History Of Machines And Mechanisms

RRP $271.99

This work deals with mechanical manufacturing processes in history, examined through the machines associated with those processes. A tool is only included if it is part of a machine tool, with devices made up of moving parts. Once the analytical field has been marked out, the chosen descriptive method is basically graphic.

This historical compendium attempts to give a wide-angle view of historical development without making an in-depth analysis of each of the examples presented. Moreover, this book illustrates the historical development of machines and mechanisms more from a technical point of view rather than a strictly history of science point of view since the authors are mechanical engineers who are interested and motivated to examine the most significant facts in their own area of knowledge of the Theory of Machines and Mechanisms. A full understanding of the historical development of Technology also needs the help of experts in technical matters who can appreciate and reassess bygone achievements in the light of their own technical knowledge. More collaboration between science historians and technical experts is needed, as is currently the case in the field of Industrial Archaeology. Thus, this book is also an attempt to set out a technical approach to the historical development of machines and mechanisms, but without too many technical details that will prevent its understanding being purely historical.

At the beginning of each chapter there is a global reference to the period embraced, the most relevant facts, and the most significant treatises in the context of machine history. Following this introduction each chapter contains a series of sections on the types of machines that are representative of the period analysed together with illustrations to accompany the text. A fairly extensive bibliography enables the reader to make a deeper historical analysis.



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Sheet Metal Fabricator Articles

Welding Underwater Welding Laser Machine Welding Basics
Metal Stool Metal Frame Metal Roof Metal Manufacturing
Metal Corrosion Metal Art Metal Gazebo Metal Furniture

Sheet Metal Fabricator Books

Welding Underwater Welding Laser Machine Welding Basics
Metal Stool Metal Frame Metal Roof Metal Manufacturing
Metal Corrosion Metal Art Metal Gazebo Metal Furniture

Sheet Metal Fabricator